Friday, January 18, 2013

From Côte d'Ivoire, to Libya, to Mali -- the FUKUS "War on Terror" in Africa, nothing but neocolonialism run amok

As the "usual suspects" (France, the UK and the US) continue their neocolonial incursions into Africa for land, resources and veritable world domination -- the string-pullers prepare for the master distraction of the Puppet-in-Chief's second coronation.

And, as has been the case for his first four years, no "Black Agenda" will be realized anywhere in the world during the next four, if we can't come together and at least --
  1. Stop dreamily training our eyes and minds on the Changeling; 
  2. Realize our combined "strength-in-numbers" across the diaspora and in Africa;
  3. Stop living the definition of insanity (doing the same things over and over again and expecting different results) and, 
  4. Begin to understand and recognize the patterns of imperialism which, today, manifest themselves as neocolonialism.
The following video from GlobalResearchTV is a start.  Here in the intro, some of the patterns from the assaults on both, Côte d'Ivoire and Libya are readily apparent:
Henningsen: Mali War Retaliation: World Police Protecting Corporate Interests in Africa

35 foreign hostages held captive at a gas field in Algeria have reportedly been killed in the operation to free them. 15 of the captors are also thought to have died, some people are apparently still being held. The local media suggests Algerian forces attacked a convoy of kidnappers and captives from the air.

Militants first attacked the complex on Wednesday, killing at least two of the staff and seizing dozens. The hostage-takers were demanding an end to the French-led combat action against insurgents in neighboring Mali. And there, the operation has intensified.

French troops are now on the ground in support of a heavy air campaign against Al-Qaeda-linked groups. The army has also received logistical support from its NATO allies, while the EU is preparing to send hundreds of military personnel to train the Malian army. (emphasis mine).




Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Delivered April 4 1967

Given what is now transpiring in Algeria and Mali, it's quite obvious that Dr. King, among other true, leaders dedicated to our self-determination, had long ago been prescient about these exact outcomes.  The revolutionary, African leader of Ghana, Kwame Nkrumah, even more so.

Nkrumah's spirit looms large in the person of Sister Affiong L. Affiong, co-founder of the Pan-African Women's Network Moyo wa Taifa and Executive Director of the Moyo Solidarity Centre based in the UK and Ghana.  I first heard this sister speak on this Sons of Malcolm post.  There, as in the video below, she not only fervently address the patterns of imperialism and neocolonialism, she vociferously calls for the identical solutions to combat them, as articulated by Nkrumah, Lumumba, Malcom and Garvey -- Pan-Africanism.  Do listen carefully, as the sound is not the best:



Dr. John Henrik Clark instructs here that:
"...the Black Race did not come to the United States culturally empty-handed...During the period in West African history -- from the early part of the fourteenth century to the time of the Moorish invasion in 1591, the City of Timbuktu, with the University of Sankore in the Songhay Empire, was the intellectual center of Africa."
The neocolonialist-backed insurgents in Mali have all but erased the great historical ruins of the "The El Dorado of Africa" with the help of imperialism -- I have to wonder if it was by design.

Instead of reading the daily diet of MSM propaganda on Mali, please check out the links below (from bottom-to-top) for a clearer picture of the ongoing recolonization of The Continent.

UPDATE:  Family, this primer (from my favorite source of non-MSM, unbiased information, "The Roving Eye," Pepe Escobar) is instructive of the depths to which FUKUS has gone, and will continue to go, to remain true -- to that aptly coined acronym, in Africa.  A bit long, but well worth the read.

Related:
- Mauritanian Consensus Against French Intervention in Mali
-'THE WAR IS IN MALI, THE TARGET IS ALGERIA' - ABDEL BARI ATWAN
-The Geopolitical Reordering of Africa: US Covert Support to Al Qaeda in Northern Mali, France “Comes to the Rescue”
- Tomgram: Nick Turse, America's Shadow Wars in Africa
- Namibian Government Blames NATO for Mali Unrest
- The Son of Africa claims a continent’s crown jewels

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

Love your blog. I do wonder tho if the old pan-africanism is more of the same insanity? It didn't work when oppression was more overt and we were closer to the memory of it so I'm sort of wary of it working now with so many younger people (who I believe would have to be instrumental in doing the heavy lifting of any successful liberation movement) not having lived thru overt oppression and sincerely believing we live in a post-racial society. I also don't understand why the african countries don't see the handwriting on the wall, realize that the CIA is fomenting internal conflicts and arming BOTH sides, and turn on THEM instead of continually following the same tired script the FUKUS axis wrote centuries ago? And that acronym is prophetic b/c that's exactly what they have been and continue to do to the world.

Deb said...

Anon...Thank you much, I'm constantly working on it, and myself!

"I do wonder tho if the old pan-africanism is more of the same insanity?"

You make a great point, one with which I too am concerned, for all the reasons you listed. And in addition those young folk -- there are "old-heads" like me, born and raised during overt oppression in the South, for whom the fog took many, many years to lift!

That said though, I think we MUST work on it -- but I am convinced it will take all of us,in the diaspora and on The Continent, expending an inordinate amount of time and energy together, to put into place that old, "each one, teach one" in order to throw off the yoke of neocolonialism. Yep, it's gonna take attitudinal shifts, hard work over hurt feelings, but most of all, the ability to critically think, freeing our minds of colonial influences and perseverance if we are to fashion a new Pan-Africanism.

The crony, African countries will be just as hard a nut to crack, because 1) FUKUS will continue to shower the corrupt leaders with money they could only dream of having and 2) They're gonna take it -- mostly for themselves, while the people suffer. Minds and hearts have been so manipulated away from who we are, it's gonna take a lot of time and dedication to reverse them -- if we can (not gonna get all of them now, and that's something of which we must be ever-vigilant).

Your suggestion that they "turn on THEM," is one that popped up in my head with regard to Israel and the US awhile back. The thought of how much we've armed them, paid them and supported them is frightening should Bibi say (as he is currently), "We'll build what the hell we like, because y'all can't stop us, Thank you very much for the nukes!"

But they'll never afford Africans access to that kind of firepower -- too scared (and rightfully so), which is why we live in a police state armed to the teeth right now! When people do foul shit to people, day-in and day-out, they're always looking over their shoulder

"And that acronym is prophetic b/c that's exactly what they have been and continue to do to the world."

That's exactly what I was thinking when I wrote it!

Thanx for dropping,
Peace

Anonymous said...

Thanks for your response. You are right about many things but your comment about them 'always looking over their shoulder' ain't nothing but the truth. I think it partly karma that with all the power they supposedly wield and yet they can't ever rest or just be..always have to be plotting and planning. And the African cronies should be dealt with in the way families deal with treasonous members--they should be held up as an example of what happens when you put your individual desires above the good of the whole. The tactic used in S. Africa during the apartheid era comes to mind. It may sound brutal, but the millions of lives lost & the mass suffering b/c of these despots betrayal is much worse.

Deb said...

Anon...No problem! Thanks for the convo!

"I think it partly karma that with all the power they supposedly wield and yet they can't ever rest or just be..always have to be plotting and planning."

Wish karma would have a heavier hand! The always plotting and planning wears me the hell out (as intended, I'm sure). I've come to a place in my life where I value - as my Grandmama and Mama always taught us -- being able to recognize the scheming in order to protect ourselves -- but I won't play (might take awhile, but once I get it, I got!). I refuse to become them.

"And the African cronies should be dealt with in the way families deal with treasonous members--they should be held up as an example of what happens when you put your individual desires above the good of the whole."

I agree with you! As Sis. Affiong said in her example about the "kneecaps" in the video, once they've been made an example of by their own, with the quickness -- the cancer is excised and the whole can heal and move forward. I'm not the brutal sort, but when it comes to someone, or something threatening me and mine, I defer to Bro. Malcolm's -- "By any means necessary."

Amenta said...

Hey Deb, I have often wondered why the African cannot see the negative works of the "pink" man as we in the West do.

I also used to wonder why we, aboriginal people of the Earth, allowed ourselves to fall into the our animal side of humaness, that 666 portion of ourselves that has allowed the pink man to appear more powerful. Way too often we easily state we are the makers and creators of civilization.

First to develop language, mathematics, society, philosophy, the arts and sciences and yet open our mouths so easily to say how much more powerful the pink man is over us. Why is that? Even when we are deeply comtemplating our condition we speak how much more powerful he is than us.."THEY will never afford Africans that kind of firepower..." So, we still can't control our destiny? THEY control it? We the makers of all the things above cannot simply control our destinies?

Do we need that particular kind of power? Can we begin to think in another way or remember a history in which we re-cognize the foundation that made us so powerful. During the time of the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade, Pink Europeans did not roam the 7 seas in perfect safety, simply because they were so powerful militarily. Each European nation had to pay West African countries hefty sums in order to travel the sea lanes. Shouldn't we then begin to think and speak like the West Africans that controlled the movements of the pink European rather than the Africans that were sold into slavery?

Sistah Affiong stated we are a global people, yet she, like we often do, only mention two sets of the whole global community. The continental African and the "Africans" in the diaspora. In the diaspora connotes, most often, those of us in the Americas and in Europe. But, we are global in the true sense of the meaning. Check out this video and just think of what kind of mind and mental power these people possesed to liberate themselves from overt firepower backed by pink European powers.

Peace!

Amenta said...

Ooops almost forgot the video...LOL!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=enOcQDLGW1c

Deb said...

Amenta...Part 1 (because I'm sure I'll run out of space).

"I have often wondered why the African cannot see the negative works of the "pink" man as we in the West do."

The way we in the West do? The African thinking is no different from most of ours in the West, Brother. If it were, the Changeling would not have garnered the majority of the Black vote -- twice -- despite the fact that he's absolutely nothing but a puppet for the "pink man, not doing jack for except bitin' on MLK's cadence. The whole, "they are less intuitive than us" thing is, IMHO, the first "divide-and conquer" line of attack implemented by the "pink man," and furthered by those of us who've believed it.

"I also used to wonder why we, aboriginal people of the Earth, allowed ourselves to fall into the our animal side of humaness, that 666 portion of ourselves that has allowed the pink man to appear more powerful. "

Not really sure what you mean by "our animal side/666 portion." That itself sounds again, like "pink man" logic. In the "animal kingdom," I have seen no evidence that man, pink or not, is believed to be more powerful. What I've seen is quite the contrary: no "animals," running away from man when he encroaches upon their territory -- they defend it; no "animals," voluntarily giving up their own to man -- they fight for them; no "animals," choosing to live with man ( pink or not), because it is more comfortable there, than with their own, etc. etc. Maybe if we had "allowed ourselves to fall into our animal side" -- we'd have fared much better than we have to date.

"Way too often we easily state we are the makers and creators of civilization.

First to develop language, mathematics, society, philosophy, the arts and sciences and yet open our mouths so easily to say how much more powerful the pink man is over us. Why is that?"


Because it's true.

"Even when we are deeply comtemplating our condition we speak how much more powerful he is than us.."THEY will never afford Africans that kind of firepower..." So, we still can't control our destiny? THEY control it? We the makers of all the things above cannot simply control our destinies?"

I don't know how you got -- "how much more powerful he is than us" from that statement I made to Anon, because it certainly had nothing to do with that! It had to do with the ability to purchase nuclear weapons from THEM. Now surely you can't believe that Western powers would arm African countries to that nuclear extent -- while they're plundering the hell out of their resources! Surely we could control our destinies if we didn't have so many OF US, willing to do anything -- to be, in all respects, exactly LIKE THEM.

Deb said...

Amenta...Part2 -- "Do we need that particular kind of power?

If you're talking nuclear power, my answer is yes -- with the caveat that they be acquired as a DETERRENT in defense of the Continent (not the reason THEY have them, obviously). Given Nagasaki and Hiroshima, I do not, in principle, support the use of nuclear weapons. But, when there are others in the world who, 1) have them; 2) have proven they will use them against those who don't and, 3) want what you have -- I think it's foolish not to have that, "particular kind of power" to defend your country. Aside from the fact that they experienced the very tragic, human fall-out from a nuclear attack and saw how it ravished human lives, the other, and main reason Japan does not have them is that the devious, "pink" man bamboozled them into signing a treaty saying they would not develop them (in return for "protection" from the veryU.S. who caused so much death and suffering!) if I'm not mistaken.

The very short list of countries who dohave them is instructive, and supports my point: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_states_with_nuclear_weapons There's definitely something about knowing a particular enemy could obliterate you as quickly as you can them that's kept these countries more or less whole.

"Can we begin to think in another way or remember a history in which we recognize the foundation that made us so powerful. During the time of the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade, Pink Europeans did not roam the 7 seas in perfect safety, simply because they were so powerful militarily. Each European nation had to pay West African countries hefty sums in order to travel the sea lanes. Shouldn't we then begin to think and speak like the West Africans that controlled the movements of the pink European rather than the Africans that were sold into slavery?"

Certainly we can -- and should. However, to date, that particular kind of "powerful" has given way to the, "I've got mine, you get yours," kind of "individualism" about which Sis. Affiong spoke. IMHO, those West Africans who controlled Europeans' movements had a more immediate memory of who we they were than those of us who, willingly or unwillingly (because no one's teaching them) hardly know anything about that.

Deb said...

Amenta...Part3 -- Sistah Affiong stated we are a global people, yet she, like we often do, only mention two sets of the whole global community. The continental African and the "Africans" in the diaspora. In the diaspora connotes, most often, those of us in the Americas and in Europe."

When she spoke of "building a critical mass," and a "global race," I doubt she was only talking about Africa and America (just as an aside, she also mentioned Jamaicans and Haitians). I believe she only spoke about those two because she was in the U.S., speaking to Black Americans and trying to make them see their connection to Africa. Speaking for myself, because I know what I mean when I say -- "in the diaspora" -- I'm not just talking about the connotation you present. Like Sis. Affiong, I'm referring to a globalized African identity, which can only be achieved, IMHO, if first, we all learn and know the history, "from whence we came."

"Check out this video and just think of what kind of mind and mental power these people possessed to liberate themselves from overt firepower backed by pink European powers."

The video was wonderful (hope you don't mind if I post it in my sidebar)!!! It certainly harkened back to those West Africans to whom you referred earlier in your comment. I am so very familiar with their, "Necessity is the Mother of invention" way of thinking, thanks to my grandparents (my Grandmama mostly, after Papa left) born and raised in one of the Sea Islands of SC. With 15 children (some in the family say 19 if you include those who died either at birth, or very close to it with no official birth certificate because she had them at home), she, like the people of Bouganville, grew her own food (yams; yellow, zucchini and acorn squash, tomatoes, okra, string beans, watermelons, peanuts, cherries, plums -- you name it!), raised her own meat (chickens for eggs and the meat and hogs, for all manner of pork, from bacon, to ham, to ham hocks and yes, to chitlins) out of necessity and know-how so she could feed her large family. She jarred everything she could for winter, and had a stand in front of the house during the summer, selling what the family did not eat to the "pink" folk heading to the beach (that was my job during the summers growing up -- because I was slow, and didn't "pick" fast enough in the field! Thank the Lawd -- I hated how okra made your hands and arms itch!). I say all that to say that I am in no way surprised that they prevailed. Francis (the then-president), no sell-out he, was a man after my own heart. What a testimony to who we are and are able to be still! Toward the end though, those old colonial ghosts kept whispering. I worried about the Vice President Kabui and I wanted to find out how it all ended -- and I did. Here is what I found: http://youtu.be/ra6_E55OOa4

Odd that you would link to the, IMHO, "beautiful struggle," but not the predictable, greed-inspired, turn-on-your-own-people ending. Francis, like Dr. King, chose not to run for president of the ABG. Could it have been, because he knew, like MLK, that you cannot change the "pink" man by working from within, because he would have either been totally absorbed like Kabui -- or destroyed?

As Dr. John Henrik Clarke said, "If you need a friend, look in the mirror! I have no problem with alliances, but you need to be in a position to punish them if they break the alliance." I think Francis understood that, which is why he chose to have no part in what Kabui was doing. Kabui died at 54, having sold out his people for "them dollar, dollar bills y'all" -- and the people of Bouganville are just as poor as they had been before Francis led them. {smdh}

Peace...

Amenta said...

"The way we in the West do? The African thinking is no different from most of ours in the West, Brother. If it were, the Changeling would not have garnered the majority of the Black vote -- twice -- despite the fact that he's absolutely nothing but a puppet for the "pink man..."


Truly most everyday people in this country do not realize their president works for someone else. They honestly believe he is the ultimate power.

We in the West do not think of white people in the same way as the African on the continent. I see no white man's divide and conquer in this, merely just how it is. IMO.


"Not really sure what you mean by "our animal side/666 portion." That itself sounds again, like "pink man" logic."

I am speaking on the beastial side of human nature, when people begin to extort, terrorize, and do all sorts of inhumane things to others. Nothing to do with the animal kingdom. Black people began to do such things to the pink people as we began losing power in Europe and were finally "pushed" out in 1492. Why did we become this way is where I was going with this. I see no pink people's logic when considering our history in Europe and especially in the so called British Isles.

"Odd that you would link to the, IMHO, "beautiful struggle," but not the predictable, greed-inspired, turn-on-your-own-people ending"

Not odd, I didn't know of this video. I was so enthralled with seeing how a people could overcome such odds and how much they could develop with the power of their minds. And that this is a lesson we all can learn from and to improve ourselves by what we can do with our minds and spirit. I never knew about or saw the follow concerning the sell out portion.

Amenta said...

Part II
When I spoke about a global people I wrote the Americas this includes, in my opinion Canada, U.S. Mexico, central/south America and all the islands of course which includes Haiti and Jamaica. However, rarely are islands like Fiji, The Marshal Islands, New Guinea, Bouganville, The Solomon Islands and other South Pacific nations included in when we are speaking of we Blacks as a "global" people. I would dare to say the vast majority of Black people, at least in the Americas don't even know there are Black people in the South Pacific, let alone would be the majority population there. Most people stop at the Aboorigines of Australia. But, do not conjur up images of Black people in the Pacific otherwise.

"I don't know how you got -- "how much more powerful he is than us" from that statement I made to Anon, because it certainly had nothing to do with that! It had to do with the ability to purchase nuclear weapons from THEM..."

Acutally I was not thinking about nuclear weapons, just weaponry in general. This led me to think about the people of Bouganville (Me'ekamui) and how they developed weapons on their own, how they developed medicines and a power plant. So, in that line if thinking I would venture to say if the African truly wanted nuclear weapons they would not have to BUY them from the European/American, but could begin a program of developing them on their own. In developing their own program they would not be buying and (hypothetically) would not be allowed by anyone to do anything. It would be from their own resources. This is where I concluded that if we rely on buying from pink folk, then we are saying he is more powerful than we. If we say he came to Africa and kidnapped us, we are saying he is more powerful than we, if we say he won't allow us to have... we are saying he is more powerful than we, IMO.

My point was that we are the makers and creators of most things we see today. And that we can do what we will if and when we choose. It is not pink logic that drives this thought but knowing just who we were and are. It is, for me, to stop using language like "they won't let or allow us..." (I am really not criticizing you or quoting here simly pointing out mind set held by many of us, including me at times) I had to stop talking about being the descendent of slaves and began to look at the full picture and start to say things like we are the descendents of a great and mighty people and find out what that was outside of Egypt, to see that we held the power world wide up until the late 1400's to the early 1500's.

This bit of information changed a lot in the way I think and speak. Just knowing we Black people created the great universities of Europe such as Oxford for example gave me pause and to comtemplate how I was thinking and speaking.

If I offended, I meant none sistah!

Peace

Deb said...

Amenta...Pt. 1
"We in the West do not think of white people in the same way as the African on the continent. I see no white man's divide and conquer in this, merely just how it is. IMO. "

That hasn't been my experience with the West Africans I know on the Continent, IMO. Since we all have a right to our own opinions, we can just agree to disagree on the afore-mentioned.

"Black people began to do such things to the pink people as we began losing power in Europe and were finally "pushed" out in 1492. Why did we become this way is where I was going with this. I see no pink people's logic when considering our history in Europe and especially in the so called British Isles."

Not long ago, I read about exactly what you describe regarding how cruel and despotic Black nobility had been in Europe, particularly around 1500 ("Black Blood is Blue Blood" is the name of the book written by a Black Dutch researcher). More than I ever knew that's for sure! As to why? I don't know, maybe that humanness you talked about. My "pink" people's logic referred to always seeing us as savages.

"Not odd, I didn't know of this video. I was so enthralled with seeing how a people could overcome such odds and how much they could develop with the power of their minds."

Neither did I. When I went to watch the link you gave, it was in the list of related videos about Bougainville on the right. After clicking a couple, I got to that one. But yes, it was enthralling to say the least.

"I would dare to say the vast majority of Black people, at least in the Americas don't even know there are Black people in the South Pacific, let alone would be the majority population there. Most people stop at the Aboorigines of Australia. But, do not conjur up images of Black people in the Pacific otherwise."

I'd agree with you there. I didn't know until I'd left home, went in the Navy, and of course, read plenty more books by Black folk!

"So, in that line if thinking I would venture to say if the African truly wanted nuclear weapons they would not have to BUY them from the European/American, but could begin a program of developing them on their own."

Given it seems, wherever Africans are, there's always uranium and other rare earth minerals that Western powers are literally killing to get, coupled with the ingenuity we saw in Bougainville, I can believe that could be accomplished. However, given the nature of nuclear plants, for power or weapons (I unfortunately lived near one in FL), it'd take a lot more than just having the uranium to get that off the ground. But they'd certainly be in a better position to get what they needed from the West -- as long as they didn't barter away the uranium!

Deb said...

Amenta...Pt. 2
"This is where I concluded that if we rely on buying from pink folk, then we are saying he is more powerful than we. If we say he came to Africa and kidnapped us, we are saying he is more powerful than we, if we say he won't allow us to have... we are saying he is more powerful than we, IMO. "

In an ideal world, where we'd not become more enthralled with "pink folk" than ourselves, I'd agree with you. But we're not, and we did. We've agreed to disagree on the "kidnap" discussion before, all I'll say is I don't believe Africans sold ALL those slave and certainly they didn't go willingly, so yes, he was more powerful than we in that regard. As far as the "allowing us to have..." -- if you don't believe there are mechanisms in place to prevent us from having everything from justice to jelly beans, I'd have to say we're not living in the same world. Now that's not to say we've not figured out plenty of ways to get under, over or past those mechanisms, but they still do exist (and are constantly being replaced with new ones!) -- and yes, those mechanisms are power.

"I had to stop talking about being the descendent of slaves and began to look at the full picture and start to say things like we are the descendants of a great and mighty people..."

I don't see the difference between the two. Rather than shame, I have a deep and abiding respect for those "great and mighty" slave ancestors of mine, who made it possible for me to sit, as I sit here today. But if making that distinction helps you deal -- do what you gotta do!

No offense taken, Brother.

Peace...

Amenta said...

Believe me I do overstand that possibly if an African nation built a power nuclear power plant and began to enrich uranium we may see bombs fly depending on the situation. I think Nigeria could do it since their leadership seems to be handcuffed to the British. I agree that there are measures in place that can and do stop us from growing. What I attempt to fight against is that idea is the prevailing thought which is so pervasive in our collective that it stops many people from even trying. I would think if there was no way to win, lets say in courts, for instance then the Comite Des Citoyen would never have attempted to take their case to court in the famous Plessy Vs. Ferguson case in 1892. I feel if we begin to see ourselves as winners, as more than the living legacy of slavery, but the embodyment (did is spell that right??? lol) of Metacomet,Loiza Aldea, or Queen Sobekneferu then I think we, as a collective can begin a new mental state of being.

Peace and Love sistah.

I am really thinking about producing a blogtalk radio program to bring us, the Afrospear onto the airwaves. I will keep you abreast.

Deb said...

Amenta..."I agree that there are measures in place that can and do stop us from growing. What I attempt to fight against is that idea is the prevailing thought which is so pervasive in our collective that it stops many people from even trying."

Brother, as usual we're not as far apart as it seems, we just tend to see the same things a little differently. I submit that, far from stopping folk from trying, the acute knowledge of what is, -- provides a spring-board, not only for trying, but success!. IMO, you can't fight and win what you don't KNOW Brother, no matter how much you change your "thoughts."

"I would think if there was no way to win, lets say in courts, for instance then the Comite Des Citoyen would never have attempted to take their case to court...I feel if we begin to see ourselves as winners, as more than the living legacy of slavery, but the embodyment (did is spell that right??? lol) of Metacomet,Loiza Aldea, or Queen Sobekneferu then I think we, as a collective can begin a new mental state of being. "

I never said "there was no way to win." As a matter of fact, I said exactly the opposite: "Now that's not to say we've not figured out plenty of ways to get under, over or past those mechanisms..."

"...let's say the courts..." -- that's the second time that you've mentioned the courts in our conversation as a solution, and I expressed the last time, exactly how I felt about "the courts" in this link: http://youtu.be/AqMG1JcR1Rg Does it work? Yes, sometimes it does -- but wa-a-ay less than it doesn't. Can it work more? Absolutely! But that depends again, on KNOWING that crooked system and using what we KNOW to fight against the injustices built into it!

But trust me, there are plenty of us who are lawyers, more than willing to buy into that system for them "dollar, dollar bills," instead of fighting its injustice (Exhibit A? The Changeling! Look, I've seen it up close, and personal ; it's sickening and reprehensible. Were it not for my pride and respect for being "the living legacy of slavery," I believe I would not have been the "winner" I was (long and recent story that I'l tell soon). ("i" instead of "y" :-D)

The radio program sounds fantastic!

Peace & Love right back atcha!

Anonymous said...

I'm intruding on an interesting a&b conversation but I have to say I'm enjoying the dialogue. I also want to thank both of you for exposing me to truths & history that I wasn't really familiar with. Thanks!

Deb said...

Anon...Welcome, and thank you (from us both, right Amenta?). I'm an "old-head," learning those "truths & history" as I continue to grow. I feel it my obligation to share, engage and listen before I check the hell out of here!

So, you're hardly "intruding on an interesting a& b conversation" -- feel free to "C" your way in! :-D

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